character stats (2)

Yora

Project Hornet

It has now been three months since I started out with my decision to learn making videogames. Since it was clear from the start that little, if any, actual work with Godot would be done during peak season at work and while looking for a new apartment, the game currently existing only as a bunch of scribbled notes is still right on schedule. But moving into my new place is now planned for late June, and I'll be taking my summer break in July. After which I'll be going from a 48-hour work week to a 35-hour week. Very excited about finally taking a crack at learning the most fundamental basics of Godot. And then, eventually, getting to the point where I can start attempting a first prototype for an actual game. Though I have to say, I've already been having a blast for the last three months working on just a general concept for what kind of game I want to create, and how it's roughly going to look and play like. I very seriously considered for a long time making a small, first person, open-world RPG like Morrowind with strong influences from Thief and System Shock 2. But…

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Yora

A Skill-based character attribute system

I may not have a lot of experience making videogames, but I do know RPG-systems! And it seems rather odd to me that so many CRPGs that have been developed over the decades very clearly attempt to emulate the mechanics used by pen and paper games to determine if an attack hits or a skill checks succeeds. Sure, it works. But those kinds of mechanics are designed around the necessity to introduce randomness by rolling dice and the ability to make all the calculations involved in your head in a second or two. These are limitations inherent to the medium, but in a videogame there really is no need to abide by them. You are needlessly restricting your own design. When the very first CRPGs were being made, and it was still completely unknown what form such games would actually take, I do see some wisdom in those early developers choosing to use a rules system that they already knew does work, and concentrating their work on the technical aspects of having it run in software. And of course, Baldur's Gate is a licensed D&D game, so obviously it had to mirror the game mechanics of D&D. But overall, as…

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